Saturday, May 6, 2017

dyno day

This morning, some guys from the car club got together to dyno test their cars.

There are always interesting things to see when I hang out with the car club...

(a formula for wheel alignment)

The place we dyno test our cars is called MD Automotive.
They are located in Westminster, CA.
It is also a highly rated repair shop.
(I would take my car here, but they mostly specialize in imports.)
http://markdibella.com/index.html



The people at the shop do endurance car racing.

They go to a race called the 24 hours of Lemons (a pun of the Le Mans race in Europe)

You are limited to spend only $500 on modifications to your car, including the purchase price!
http://www.24hoursoflemons.com/

I wish I were part of that group. It looks like so much fun!

They race with a really awesome car, the Franken-Miata.



Every year they paint it with a different theme.
(The first time I saw it, it had a campy horror, Frankenstein theme, which is how it got its name.)

It's also been a Star Wars space ship, a flowery hippy theme, and something like Mad Max.


edit: Apparently, Star Wars-themed Lemons cars is a thing!
In this article,  scroll way down to see their Miata as the Enterprise: (oops Star Trek not Star Wars)
http://www.roadkill.com/galaxy-far-far-away-star-wars-themed-cars-lemons/


(I forgot to ask them what this year's theme was supposed to mean...)

Each time I see it, it's missing more of its body.
The spoiler is made from a cardboard box!



Here it is at a track:
https://www.facebook.com/24hoursoflemons/photos/a.10154771855444495.1073741914.36766739494/10154771860804495/?type=3&theater






Today there were only three cars doing the dyno test.

This is Troy's Corvette.



He put his new motor in about the same time as mine.
It has similar components, and we both didn't get very satisfactory dyno results at first.

That was more than two years ago.
Since then he has changed some parts, and picked up some horsepower, but it was down again this time.

It gives me hope that I can find my own missing horsepower...



Dyno testing requires setting the car down on a roller, tying it to the ground, and hooking up some computers.
Then the car is raced, and the computer makes a graph of the torque and horsepower.




The computer also gives out a reading on things like air-fuel ratio, or if components are working right.
We use the info to edit the car's memory chip and make adjustments.
Then run it again and see if the change brought more horsepower!

It can be very loud, and almost as fun as racing.



Here is another person's car.
"My dad's car is pretty cool, huh?" she said.


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